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In Commemoration of the 100th Anniversary of the Opening of Korczak's Orphanage - Bar Mitzvah Activity for Children in the Kadima Homes

On 19 March, twenty-five youth – Jewish, Arab, and the children of migrant workers – visited Yad LaYeled from three Kadima children’s homes – in Yavne, Ramle, and the Shapira neighborhood of Tel Aviv. The children were accompanied by their counselors, who are serving a year of national service at these homes for children-at-risk run by the LaSova Foundation.

 

According to Adi Iges, director of the Shapira youth home in south Tel Aviv, the visit is part of the “Bar/Bat Mitzvah Project”, in which children have to complete a series of missions to prepare them for the rite of passage on which they are embarking. One of these missions is in-depth study of the Jewish Holocaust and the lessons drawn from it. Anat Carmel, director of Yad LaYeled, graciously agreed to create a program for this project. Youth from grades 7 and 8 participated in three activities on the subject and worked on preparing a Holocaust Day ceremony and presenting it to other youths and their parents.

 

The program developed at Yad LaYeled highlights the 100th anniversary of the orphanage established by Janusz Korczak and “growing up in the shadow of war”. The activity included a visit to the exhibit, “The Story of the Jewish Child during the Holocaust”, participation in the interactive exhibit “Janusz Korczak of the Children”, and making “Kites of Hope”, which were flown on the Museum lawn. Their cries of joy were particularly moving.

 

This activity was made possible thanks to several contributions, for which we are very grateful: the Fund for Restitution of Properties who financed the bus transportation for the children and the Claims Conference who funded the workshops.  In addition, hot lunches were provided by a soup kitchen in Acre.

 

The nineteen Kadima youth homes established by LaSova operate as after-school centers for children and youth at-risk who are referred by municipal welfare offices. The homes serve children from grades 4 through 12 – Jewish, Arab, and the children of migrant workers.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

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